Pimenov Yuri

Pimenov Yuri

Pimenov always wanted to be a contemporary artist: to embody the present, the feeling of the soul and form of life’s every passing day. For this reason, he ended up a very “Soviet” artist.
 
In 1924, Pimenov took part in the “First Discussion Exhibit of Collected Active Revolutionary Art” with a group of Vkhutemas students, where he studied from 1920-1925. Within a year, the participants formed the Society of Easel Painters. “Football, boxing, factory architecture, construction cranes – the newest, the most perfect – these were all my and my comrades' passions,” Pimenov recalled.
 
But it wasn’t just a theme – the whole structure and framework of his art was done created in a strictly contemporary fashion. German Expression was his model, with its sharp, sometimes grotesque visual language. Pimenov painted “The Wounded of the War,” with eyeless masks in place of faces (1926); ascetic, skeletal athletes (“Running,” 1928) and similarly emaciated workers in front of coarsely-drawn locomotives and steel mills in the poster, named for both its heading and concept, “Yield to Heavy Industry!” (1927).

Toward the 1930s, this affected severity disappeared from Pimenov’s work. “I want to make elegant and lyrical art,” he declared. With light, quick brushstrokes and bright colors he painted female portraits (“Portrait of L.A. Eremina,” 1935), nature in Moscow’s suburbs, the overflowing assortment of trinkets and tapestries in an actress’ dressing room (“Actress,” 1935). Life's rainbow-colored surface fascinated him: the freshly-built aggregation of Okhotnyy Ryad, the freshly-trimmed nape of a girl’s neck, her hands on the wheel of a convertible, tacks in the windscreen – all in the pink and blue tints of an impressionist lithograph (“New Moscow,” 1937)… 

Echo

Petrov Nikolay
Plisetskaya Maya
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